New Zealand Dollar

Introduction New Zealand Dollar

Prior to switching to the New Zealand Dollar in 1967, the currency used in New Zealand was the pound, which was similar to, but not the same as the British Pound. The present-day New Zealand Dollar is notable for its endearing nickname, the “Kiwi”, for its $1 depiction of the famous flightless bird. Today, the New Zealand Dollar is one of the 10 most-traded currencies in the world and accounts for around 1.6% of the global foreign exchange market daily turnover.

New Zealand Dollar Facts

New Zealand dollar futures allow traders to assess value against the U.S. dollar, as well as the opportunity to address risk from currency fluctuations in other foreign trade markets.

Since the 1930s, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand has set monetary policy for its currency. This determines how much money is pumped into their economy and ultimately affects the interest rates of the New Zealand dollar. The Reserve Bank sets their Official Cash Rate (OCR) or the price of money loaned out in order to help control inflation. Events like inflation can have an impact on the strength of the economy and overall the value of the New Zealand dollar.

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